What is Ambrose Hunter?

I have started a new video game project in collaboration with my friend Dylan Cinti – this project is called Ambrose Hunter. Ambrose Hunter is the story of a video game developer slash entrepreneur making his way in Los Angeles. My friend Dylan is writing the novel portion of the project, and I am making the video game portion. There are aspects of Ambrose Hunter that can be considered experimental infotainment because they double as a professional advice – including a free eBook we will be releasing called Rules of the Gamedev.

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Dylan and I worked together on an interactive film project, Profiles of the Forgotten. Now, we are combining our talents in a new way – literature alongside a video game.

Technologically, Ambrose Hunter will be cannibalizing my past two video game projects,  reusing the driving code and character code of one and the other. I will also be adding new systems which have not been implemented in prior games, including a save system, a time system (time is always passing and there is a night/day cycle) as well as an open world exploration model – you will be able to explore areas without being forced to do anything in particular, but there will also be missions and characters for you to meet. You will also be attacked by homeless people and infested by cockroaches.

In other news, I have been working on a multiplayer update to Archangel VR at Skydance Interactive. I will be releasing a VR Game Design eBook that talks about the development process therein, going into the details of network programming, VR design, and overcoming obstacles of VR development.

Stay tuned – more updates to come.

Book Recommendation: Edmund Burke’s “A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful”, for a analytical breakdown of how the mind appreciates art and literature with a focus on the elements of terror, uncertainty, fear, and negative aspects of life as the core constituents of emotional experience.

What is caRPG-13?

caRPG-13 is the early prototype of a game in which human beings have all become hover cars and consume gas to survive. When a car runs out of gas, it dies just like a human would if it ran out of oxygen or food. Just like humans, these cars can also fall in love. I wanted to make a game where you felt romantic feelings toward a car while struggling to survive in an apocalyptic, resource starved, labyrinthian city. The goal of the game is to reach the top of the city and get into an escape pod before it is too late – time is always ticking and gas is always being spent.

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Encountering a Mechanic AI who can help repair broken cars

So far, all art assets in caRPG-13 are modified versions from a failed racing game I worked on a year ago – shout out to the artists who made these – you know who you are. The practical thing about using hover cars as humans is that you do not have to worry about animations of any sort, so you can focus on programming other features – in my case I am most interested in NPC AI and character interaction and how they can fit into a game’s design and emotional experience.

I am modeling caRPG-13 off of the famous game Pathologic by using resources vs time to propel the game objectives forward. However, unlike Pathologic which focuses on the simulation of a complex, evolving society, caRPG-13 will focus on character evolution over time and aim to derive narrative meaning out of non-static character interaction.

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A typical Pathologic character interaction

While Pathologic was a masterpiece, it left a little to be desired in terms of character interaction. With a whole cast of interesting characters all you could do with them was go into one of their houses and talk. These main characters did not move and could not react to you in physical space. In games, it seems that the most common way to interact with characters in a non-violent way is through quests and text trees. While these are a nice staple for storytelling, there are certainly many other ways to build relationships between characters – namely through physical action. What I want to do in caRPG-13 is experiment with a few new types of non-violent interaction between a player and NPC that may enrich the emotional consequences of player agency in the game. In my next blog post, I will talk about the romance that evolves between two lucky cars in caRPG-13. Please subscribe.

Book Recommendation: “The Death of Ivan Ilyich” by Leo Tolstoy, a novella for those who prefer to work hard and make tons of money rather than address their deeper personal issues.

-Pablo Leon-Luna

 

Introduction

My name is Pablo Leon-Luna. I work at a company called BrainRush in Santa Monica where I develop corporate Unity Games and attempt to build backend web technology using NodeJS. This is how I survive in Los Angeles.

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However, when I am not at work I am developing my current game project: CaRPG-13, writing about video games, reading assorted books, and teaching myself to draw. I wanted to write a book called “Mechanics of Dread” inspired by the game Pathologic by Ice Pick Lodge and how it affects the future of games as an art form, but then I realized that writing a book was too much of a time commitment so I am going write this blog instead. Future posts will be about video game theory, software development, tech company culture, and the development of CaRPG-13. At the end of each post I will recommend a book. Please subscribe.

Book Recommendation: “Excavating Kafka” by James Hawes for those who want to explore how history distorts our understanding of an artist’s life and the meaning of his work.